2014 Tolliver Reunion

12th Annual Tolliver Reunion

Carl D. Perkins Community Center

Route 32/Flemingsburg Rd., Morehead, KY

June 27-28, 2014

Friday, June 271:00 Informal time at Community Center

     5:30 Dinner at Ponderosa (across from Hampton Inn)

     7:00 Talent-Hobby Show, Bingo, Sharing information

Saturday, June 28 – 9:00 Registration, visiting and informal sharing.

     11:45 Potluck Lunch

     1:00 Welcome; introductions;  Dr. J. D. Reeder, author of Bloody Rowan.

              Divide into family groups.

     2:00 Share stories from small groups.

     3:00 Announce winning bids from the Silent Auction.  Tour cemeteries and feud                        

                 sites on your own.

 Housing -  Hampton Inn – 40 rooms until June 1st.  Call 1-606-780-0601  to make your reservation.  Tell them you are a part of the Tolliver Reunion.  Cost:    $92.00 plus tax.

    Silent Auction -  Money is used to support the Reunion, such as mailings, building  rental, etc.  Bring items either Friday or Saturday.    There is no charge for registration.

   The Community Center is easily accessible and air-conditioned.

   More Information -  Emma Lee Tolliver – 614-267-6556; ELT1000@aol.com

   Website -  Tolliverfamily.com

Hope to see you there.

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Carla Eberwein

Carla Eberwein makes our potluck lunch at the Reunion run smoothly.  She also handles the Silent Auction.  This week she was given the Chamber Champion Award, part of the Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce’s One Great Community Salutes initiative.  Carla works in sales at the Holiday Inn in Richmond, IN.  Mary Walker, executive director of the Wayne County Convenbtion & Tourism Bureau stated that “Carla has worked in every aspect of the hospitality industry.  She goes above and beyond and she does not know what the word ‘no’ means.”  We appreciate all that Carla does to make our Tolliver Reunion a success.  She is super!

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2013 Tolliver Reunion

The 11th Tolliver Reunion held June 2013 quickly turned into a Reunion and Talent Show.  We havealways had a talent show on Friday evening with children and youth performing.
This year the definition of talent took on new and broader meaning.

On Friday evening C. J. Wing (from John 1760) played his guitar and sang.  Then
Erin Smith (from Wade Hampton 1815) sang.  They provided a great start to the evening.  John Tolliver (from Wade Hampton) sang and played his guitar.  Then Lea Ann Lyon led
the group in her own version of Tolliver Bingo.  Meanwhile, Dr. J. D. Reeder showed a video of the drama Bloody Rowan that told the story of the Tolliver-Martin Feud.  Dr. Reeder wrote and directed the play that was produced in Morehead in October.

On Saturday the talent continued to blossom.  Tami Fonger and her sister, Starla Criser, from KS showed us the most beautiful genealogical scrapbook I have ever seen.  It had photos, certificates, news articles, and all kinds of records beautifullyarranged.  They also had some small quilt hangings decorated with  family records.  Tami and Starla descend from John Toliver b. 1760 through his son John Jr.  The interesting thing is that Tami married a man in KS who descends from John Toliver b. 1760 through his son William.
That makes Tami’s daughter, Ashley, a double Tolliver.  Wow!  It is their brother, Patrick, whose DNA matches my husband, Bill, exactly.   John Jr. was formerly known as the Tippecanoe Tollivers because we didn’t know who he was until the DNA test.  Starla has also written some books.  She shared the book titled Timeless Love, a book for older persons.

Another new person to the Reunion this year was William Guy Tolliver from IL and KS who descends from Josiah b.1790.  He has written seven books.  One is his memoirs and the other six are fiction.  Then we heard from Sabrina Tolliver Kiser with her book Dove’s Trail, a true story about Lytte Tolliver (John 1760) who had a horse stolen during the Civil War.  Dan Capal’s book about Tollivers in the Civil War was also for sale.

Carolyn Tolliver White, a musician and fiber artist from TN, shared some of her wearable artwork.  She and her sister Jane Tolliver Gamble descend from John b. 1760 through his son James and then Lytte.

As we met in the afternoon, we remembered Eleanor Tolliver Waters and John Cooper Tolliver, Jr. who had died this year.  Both were long-time Tolliver researchers.  Much of the information that we have comes from these two individuals.   They started searching in the 1950s and continued to share all that they discovered.  We will really miss them.

Donald Tolliver, from Whitesburg, KY was recognized as a Tolliver Patriarch for his continued work with Tolliver cemeteries.  In 2007 when we restored the Old Tolliver Cemetery in NC, Don Tolliver and Jim Oxford took the leadership to get it done.  Don has continued this work.  Every May he goes back there and puts up a new flag and places new flowers on all the graves.  Sometimes he makes a second trip.  Steven Moxley who lives near the cemetery helps keep it clean during the summer.   We appreciate these men.

Our small family groups were excellent this year.  Jim Oxford, Benny Tolliver, Kim Tolliver, and John Tolliver led the groups.  As I went around to the different groups, the leaders had their groups engaged.  Individuals were sharing stories and asking questions.  One group even  made a diagram showing relationships.

Our project at this time is restoring the Jacob Finley Toliver Cemetery in Elliott Co., KY.  Jacob Finley was a Civil War soldier and Prisoner of War.  I have tried to get a
Civil War marker for him but at this point they have rejected it because there
is a community stone with the words, Jacob Finley and dates but not Tolliver.  They consider that a marked grave.  I disagree and we are still working on that.  His name was Tolliver, not Finley.  Craig Toliver from the Feud is also buried there.  There are about
thirteen graves in the cemetery.  It is located on Buddy Pennington’s farm.  At present the new fence is almost finished and extra dirt has been placed on sunken graves at the cost of $200.  Grass will be sown.  We are buying a lawn mower so it can be mowed as needed.  We are working on some kind of metal sign that will be placed down at the road and
another larger sign that will be placed at the cemetery that will have names and dates for persons buried there.  Donations are needed to cover the cost of the signs.

In the Silent Auction, we saw more talent.   Some of the homemade things were pearl earrings, a walking stick, an afghan, dishcloths, and raw honey.  There were many other items donated as well.  Money from this is used for rent on the building, stamps, printing pictures, plates, cups, drinks, cookies, etc.  Thank you for your help.

The youngest in attendance this year were Brooklyn and Elaina.  Brooklyn is the daughter of Taylor and Kara Tolliver.  Elaina is the daughter of Jonathan and Sierra Tolliver.  Each received a Tolliver bear.  An interesting note is that both Taylor and Jonathan started coming to the Reunion when they were about eight years of age.

Ken and Gail Whiteaker and Shawn Flora showed their talents at the Registration table making pictures and keeping everything in order.

Carla Eberwein organized and set up for the potluck lunch for which everyone showed their cooking skills.  Mike Tolliver and Erin Smith helped her as well as several others.  Thanks to everyone for the delicious food.

It appears the Tollivers are truly a talented bunch.  As our song goes, “If you are proud to be a Tolliver, clap your hands…”  The 2014 Reunion will be June 27-28 at Morehead, KY.  Hope to see you there.

Emma Lee and William Tolliver

ELT1000@aol.com

 

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11th Annual Tolliver Reunion

Carl D. Perkins Community Center

Route 32/Flemingsburg Rd., Morehead, KY

June 21-22, 2013

Friday, June 21 – 1:00 Informal time at Community Center

5:30 Dinner at Ponderosa (across from Hampton Inn)

7:00 Talent-Hobby Show, Bingo, Bloody Rowan video

Saturday, June 22 – 9:00 Registration, visiting and informal sharing.

11:45 Potluck Lunch

1:00 Welcome; introductions; Dr. J. D. Reeder, author of Bloody Rowan.

Divide into family groups.

2:00 Share stories from small groups.

3:00 Announce winning bids from the Silent Auction. Tour cemeteries and feud

sites on your own.

Housing – Hampton Inn is reserving 50 rooms until June 1st. Call 1-606-780-0601 to make your reservation. Tell them you are a part of the Tolliver Reunion. Cost: $94.00 plus tax.

Silent Auction – Money is used to support the Reunion, such as mailings, building rental, etc. Bring items either Friday or Saturday. There is no charge for registration.

The Community Center is easily accessible and air-conditioned.

More Information – Emma Lee Tolliver – 614-267-6556; ELT1000@aol.com

All Tolliver descendants are welcome.  Our Tollivers go back to NC in the 1700s.

Hope to see you there.

 

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Rowan County War Documentary

The video below was shared by Terry Tolliver. Terry lives in Missouri and has attended the Tolliver reunion in the past.

The video shows Fred Brown who wrote Days of Anger, Days of Tears, talking about the Feud. It was the last thing Fred about the Feud before his accident.

Do share your comments on this post regarding the video if you have anything to note, or questions to ask. Thanks!

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Eleanor Tolliver Waters

               The Tolliver family has lost our Matriarch.  Eleanor Tolliver Waters, a descendant of John Tolliver b. 1760, left us Friday, October 26, 2012.  She was a dear friend of mine.  I will really miss her.

               When I retired from teaching in 1999, I started my genealogy venture.  While researching the Tolliver family on the Internet started working on the Tolliver family.  On the Internet I quickly met Velma Tolliver Parmerton, who along with her brother, John Cooper Tolliver, had worked on Tolliver family genealogy for many years.  Velma encouraged me to contact her friend and fellow researcher, Eleanor Waters.  On our yearly return trip from Florida to our home in Ohio, my husband, Bill, and I stopped at a motel near Woodstock, Georgia and decided to call Eleanor.  She invited us to come over.  We got to her home about 7 p.m.  At 1:30 a.m.  Eleanor was still going strong.  Being on oxygen did not dampen her spirits or slow her down.  She was so excited to share her research. 

             This first contact was the first of many visits and hundreds of phone calls, many lasting more than a couple hours.   She taught me so much about how and where to research.  She did not use a computer so she would call me and tell me about something she had found and want me to search on the Internet.  I would find the information and mail it to her.  She told me many times, “Now don’t you print this until we can prove it.”  Her genealogy information was well researched and documented.  This is what makes her work so special.  She wanted it to be correct and she wanted it available for others to see. 

Even the last few weeks as she became weaker she was still interested in the Tollivers.   The last time I spoke with her about a week ago she asked as always, “Do you know anything new?”  I was able to tell her about a young man who had contacted me that week requesting Tolliver information.  I was able to give him his family information dating back to about 1800.  Eleanor was very gratified that her research helped families find their ancestors.  It gave her a sense of fulfillment to help others.  I like to think she is walking around heaven searching for John Tolliver to ask him who his parents were.  That was our genealogical brick wall.

               Eleanor started her genealogy search before the Internet.   She dug through the old, dusty records in Courthouses located in Virginia, North Carolina, and Kentucky.  She meticulously copied marriage, birth, death, and land records by hand .  She also went to the Archives in Washington, D.C. and many libraries seeking accurate information.  Over the years she corresponded with many persons connecting them with their ancestors.  Most of the “old” Tolliver information that we have from the 1700 and 1800’s came from Eleanor’s research.  She did not want all of the information lost.  She wanted it available for others.  Eleanor’s desire to provide a single source of Tolliver information led me to create a website called Tolliverfamily.com where I have posted several family lines.  Together, we created genealogy books that I have dedicated to our Tolliver Matriarch, Eleanor Tolliver Waters. 

               Eleanor was a very intelligent, kind, and generous person.  Some may not know she also had a real sense of humor.  One evening we were visiting.  Eleanor and I were at her kitchen table going over genealogy.  Bill was watching TV in the living room.  She looked at me, smiled, and said, “I am going to get Bill.”  She took the remote and turned the sound off on the TV.   Bill said, “The sound went off on the TV.”  Eleanor looked at me and winked and said, “You had it so loud we couldn’t hear each other.”  She had a big smile.  She had gotten Bill.  There were many times that we were able to laugh together.  We will miss Eleanor’s sense of humor.

               This past February when we visited Eleanor, her physical condition was making her sleep most of the night in her recliner, but her attitude remained cheerful.  Unless you were aware of her physical ailments, you would not know how ill she was.  This was in large part because of her belief that God was with her and that when this life would be over that God would continue to be with her.  She had a sense of appreciation for all that God had given to her.   Her faith in God helped her to face her physical condition with calmness, an attitude of acceptance, and joyfulness. 

               In closing, I will always be indebted to Eleanor for her friendship, generosity, kindness, and love.  Now and in the future, Tolliver descendants will continue to look to Eleanor’s work to learn about their ancestors.  Future generations will come to appreciate all that she has done.  If we could elect a Queen of Tolliver Genealogy, Eleanor would win by a landslide.  Eleanor was my friend and everyone who was blessed to know her, including Bill and me, will miss her.

Emma Lee Tolliver

 

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I Attended Bloody Rowan

I am a TOLLIVER and last night (Oct 5th), I was excited and pleased to view your performance of Bloody Rowan. Since my party and I had driven from Lexington, we had to leave as soon as the program was over. Unfortunately, no time to stay and give everyone my “raves” of their performances, writing and direction skills. To use colloquial vernacular, it was SUPER!!  I could tell everyone worked so hard to bring “the times of the county” and the story, to view.
For any of you who might would like to know about one of the “limbs” of the tree relating to Morehead and the feud:
Two brothers of my great grandfather (Jones), Joel and James William Morgan Tolliver, drove a buckboard from Nicholas County (Carlisle) to Morehead for some supplies. They parked the buckboard and was walking between houses to the next street. As they got to the next street over, shooting broke out and William Morgan was wounded in the shoulder. They both managed to roll under the sidewalk for cover. Back then the sidewalks were built up from the ground as the streets were dirt and, of course turned to mud when it rained.
When the fighting began to move farther up the street, Uncle Joel helped his brother out from under the sidewalk and back to the buckboard.
On their way back to Nicholas County, they stopped at William C Lowe’s home for help for William Morgan and stayed a few days until he was well enough to travel.
With very best regards to all,
Kay Tolliver Barnes
PS,
JD, WONDERFUL job!!!

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Bloody Rowan Drama

The Morehead Theatre Guild will present Bloody Rowan October 5-7 and October 12-14, 2012 at the old Courthouse Theater in Morehead, KY. This play was written by and will be directed by Dr. J. D. Reeder. It is part of the Morehead State University’s 125th anniversary celebration. Dr. Reeder is a Tolliver descendant and an authority on the Tolliver-Martin Feud. The feud is also known as the Rowan County War. Tickets for the play may be purchased on-line at the following website, www.moreheadtheatre.org  by anyone who has a PayPal account or any other credit card.  Just follow the instructions on the website. Make sure you print your receipt. You will need it when you claim your tickets at the box office. Tickets will also be available in advance at CoffeeTree Books in Morehead, and they will be available at the door at the Rowan County Arts Center, 205 West Main St., Morehead, prior to each performance (unless they sell out). I strongly recommend advance purchase. Everyone who purchases tickets is urged to arrive 30 minutes before the play begins to get the best seat selection.

 

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John Cooper Tolliver, Jr.

The whole Tolliver family lost a Patriarch June 23, 2012.  John Cooper Tolliver, Jr. was born October 21, 1925 in Fleming Co., KY.  He was the son of John Cooper Tolliver, Sr. and Bessilene Hysong.  John Cooper Tolliver, Sr. was the son of Lee Andrew Tolliver and Margaret McKenzie.  Lee Andrew was the son of Jacob Finley Tolliver and Orlena Wyatt.  Jacob Finley was the son of James Tolliver and Mary Baldwin.  James was the son of John Tolliver b. 1760, a Revolutionary War soldier, and Tabitha Howell.           

 John became interested in genealogy at an early age.  He visited almost every county courthouse and library in VA and NC searching for his family’s history.  In the early sixties he was the first to document where John, the Revolutionary soldier, was buried.  This is the cemetery that we later had the grave-marking ceremony by the Sons of the American Revolution.  He made many trips to the National Archives in Washington, DC.  A couple of the records he found were John’s Revolutionary War records and Jacob Finley’s Civil War record that included information about Jacob Finley being a prisoner of war in NY.  He encouraged and helped his sisters to join the DAR.  Without John and his sisters, Velma and Wilma, and Eleanor Tolliver Waters, I would have very little of the old information on this website.  At our Reunion June 22-23, 2012, many people signed a “Thinking of You” card to send to John.  He left us before he could see the card. 

            He will be greatly missed not only by his immediate family but by the many hundreds of Tolliver descendants who want to know their family history now and in the future.  He will be remembered as one of the pioneers in genealogy who earned the title of Patriarch of the Tolliver family.  Thank you, John, for all that you did.                                                                              Emma Lee Tolliver

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Drama about the Tolliver-Martin Feud

The Morehead Theatre Guild will present Bloody Rowan October 5-7 and October 12-14, 2012 at the old Courthouse Theater in Morehead, KY.  This play was written by and will be directed by Dr. J. D. Reeder.  It is part of the Morehead State University’s 125th anniversary celebration.  Dr. Reeder is a Tolliver descendant and an authority on the Tolliver-Martin Feud.  It is also known as the Rowan County War.

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